HomePortalFAQRegisterLog in

altText
altText
altText
altText
altText
altText

Share | 
 

 Real life

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3
AuthorMessage
therowfamily
Super user
Super user
avatar

Posts : 529
Join date : 2010-03-09

PostSubject: Real life   Fri May 13, 2011 9:52 am

First topic message reminder :

I've been looking on the forum and read some very good posts about life in Bulgaria but nothing will ever beat the reality of trying it at first hand which then led me to think Why not take it a step further. For example does anyone offer the option to stay with a Bulgarian/English family in a small town or village in Bulgaria. it will acquaint those thinking of buying with everyday life of the contemporary Bulgarians and the expats with their hopes and problems that they face every day. They would also get a feel of the warmth of Bulgarians and their hospitality.They could be shown interesting local places such as monastery, cafe, restaurant, church , museum, and market, supermarkets and other useful stores even a graveyard whatever takes their fancy. Another is they could be shown how to make some of the traditional meals like: “Banitza” “Gjuvetch”, “Kjufte” or “Kebapche”. Depending on the season they could also be making winter preserves and pickles, “Ljutenitza”- tomatoes and red peppers based sauce (spread), the unique Bulgarian yoghurt or feta cheese. This will not only bring them closer to the daily life of the Bulgarians, but they could find more about current social and political situation and how the changes in the last decade affected the ordinary people and what life is really like on a daily basis and even get involved in the chores etc. This is only a thought but a good one I think and I'm sure someone could make use of it in some way.
Back to top Go down

AuthorMessage
Equinus
Super user
Super user
avatar

Posts : 697
Join date : 2012-06-17

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Wed Oct 31, 2012 2:35 pm

I'm pleased to read that you have talked yourself back into Bulgaria Oldun. It can't be all bad then!

The only thing that really worries me is the treatment of animals. Always does when I go to a new country. We have both worked with animals most of our working lives in various different ways, so obviously have a soft spot for any creature. After a Greek friend proudly showed us around his family smallholding in the hills of Samos a couple of times, I found it hard to come to terms with what seems to be "
the norm"
of keeping rabbits in dark sheds, pigs and goats in tiny dark concrete pens, (though have to admit, very clean) I know I will find it hard to adjust to, never mind goats strung up to a tree at the side of the road being gutted....and me a vegetarian! Not Mr Eq though. But adjust I will, as long as it is tradition and not wanton cruelty. No idea what we will find in Bulgaria, will just have to wait and see.

But otherwise, I will adjust my life to fit as appropriate and try to integrate as much as possible. We will have our modern day luxuries in the form of electrical goods and furniture, but if we cannot afford to replace them then we will manage without, not for the first time! They are just "
things"
after all.

Roll on March...we want to come see!

Mrs Eq

_________________
Failing to plan is planning to fail.
Back to top Go down
oldun
Super user
Super user


Posts : 1275
Join date : 2009-09-19

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Wed Oct 31, 2012 4:25 pm

I understand what you are saying Equinnus. However, at least in our village animals are not badly treated although not mollycoddled as in Britain maybe. I have hardened my soft heart to some of the things that are the norm here. Don't forget that farming is not a soft option even in Britain and if people saw the slaughter abattoirs they might be equally appalled. My son worked in one aged 15 for a summer job and took great delight in telling me some horrible gory stories. Yes, ritual pig killing seems barbaric but in its way it is done as humanely as possible although many will disagree. If you eat meat this is something to come to terms with when you see it happen.
We have some puppies next door to us. They are fed bread but you can see their ribs and one brave soul ventures to our fence and watches our dog and cats being fed with the saddest eyes. I throw over some dog biscuits which frightens the poor thing to death but eventually returns to eat them.
These are things to come to terms with and British people have to learn to accept Bulgarian village ways. Our dog lives outside in her homemade cosy kennel and is happy. Our cats are still half feral but know when the feeding times are! In England I am sure the cats would soon become couch potatoes as would the dog. Our lovely dog is the best guard dog we could have and only barks when something or someone is untoward although she is not at all vicious and the cats catch the vermin. Animals here all have to 'work'. Of course there is cruelty around which is why its important to choose the right village!
Back to top Go down
Equinus
Super user
Super user
avatar

Posts : 697
Join date : 2012-06-17

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Wed Oct 31, 2012 6:00 pm

I know a fair bit about farming having worked on farms for years....which is why I don't eat meat. Shouldn't drink milk either but can't give everything up! And someone else on here touched on the pig thing....will have to make sure new neighbours don't have pigs.

I try not to get involved in how people keep their animals, and you are right, exposure hardens your attitude somewhat. I remember years ago when I started to go to our local horse auction how shocked I was at how the animals are treated at the auction, and their condition. But I really believe now that the meat man is the best friend of a lot of the horses there. People who think they know me are surprised how matter of fact I can be, but it is not me mistreating the animals and subjecting them to such a frightening experience, others must do what they will. (our otherwise protected lad has been through twice, once bought by the meatman but saved by his looks and temperament)

As for finding a "
kinder"
village, how on earth would you do that? Surely you wouldn't know unless you lived there.

Mrs Eq

_________________
Failing to plan is planning to fail.
Back to top Go down
oldun
Super user
Super user


Posts : 1275
Join date : 2009-09-19

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:58 pm

I live in one of the kindest villages around but many people still buy by price not looking at the bigger picture and taking no notice of what is written on forums. I know this because I have been a 'forumite' ever since living in Bulgaria and generally speaking, people are more proud of saying they got a property for 10,000euros than for paying a bit more for a nicer place to live which they will most likely find out too late. I will expect some tart replies to this last comment but it is the truth.
Back to top Go down
itchyfeet
Mega user
Mega user
avatar

Posts : 2267
Join date : 2010-09-10
Age : 61
Location : Paskalevets

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Thu Nov 01, 2012 3:19 pm

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] wrote:


The only thing that really worries me is the treatment of animals. Always does when I go to a new country. We have both worked with animals most of our working lives in various different ways, so obviously have a soft spot for any creature. After a Greek friend proudly showed us around his family smallholding in the hills of Samos a couple of times, I found it hard to come to terms with what seems to be "
the norm"
of keeping rabbits in dark sheds, pigs and goats in tiny dark concrete pens, (though have to admit, very clean) I know I will find it hard to adjust to, never mind goats strung up to a tree at the side of the road being gutted....and me a vegetarian! Not Mr Eq though. But adjust I will, as long as it is tradition and not wanton cruelty. No idea what we will find in Bulgaria, will just have to wait and see. Mrs Eq

It is fortunate that you never decided to live in Turkey where cruelty to animals is rife. Street dogs are kicked and have stones thrown at them by the Turks and then they wonder why the poor animal lurches forward and bites them. Sheep Bayram is not something to witness either, depending on where you live in Turkey sheep are sometimes slaughtered in the street or the sidewalk by having their throats slit by someone who has the "
honour"
of killing the animal, it is then strung up while it kicks it's legs while all the blood drains out of it. It is not uncommon for cows to be treated the same way. Bulgaria has undoubtedly a long way to go to come up to the UK standard of looking after animals, but we have not seen any cruelty to animals whilst we have been walking or driving around Bulgaria. That it is not to say there isn't cruelty here, but we haven't been witness to any cruelty.

c
Back to top Go down
fruitlover
Senior user
Senior user


Posts : 203
Join date : 2011-02-02

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Thu Nov 01, 2012 4:58 pm

It depends whether you class small thin bony horses being driven with a stick to pull heavily loaded carts uphill as cruelty or not. I was told if the pigs were let out they would burn severely in the sun, being pale skinned indoor breeds. Finding a 'nice' village can be hard, as people with a property to sell tend to say theirs is nice and you don't know who you can trust and who is exaggerating. People who live in BG full time may assume their village is safe because they've never been burgled yet, when they might have if they'd ever left it empty. Those who genuinely live in a good, safe and friendly place, are (understandably) not always keen to let strangers know in case they are inadvertently letting in the unscrupulous, and advertising the presence of properties worth rifling. I hoped people would p.m. me about safe friendly locations where we could leave a property unoccupied and not lose everything, but in fact hardly anyone did and one can't blame them really. I'd still like to know though, because although I love our house, there's a neighbour who plays loud music all the time, and I don't want to make waves because he's been there longer and nobody else seems to mind, so I wouldn't want to spoil his enjoyment of life just because I prefer peace &
quiet! I'd rather re-sell and find a place where I wouldn't start out by upsetting anyone.

Oldun, I'm so glad you are finding life there better again, at least with a UK base you keep your options open don't you. Once you know you could leave at any time, I imagine it will be easier to see exactly what you will put up with and what you won't!
Back to top Go down
tonyb60
Mega user
Mega user


Posts : 2150
Join date : 2010-02-18

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Thu Nov 01, 2012 5:40 pm

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] wrote:
It depends whether you class small thin bony horses being driven with a stick to pull heavily loaded carts uphill as cruelty or not. I was told if the pigs were let out they would burn severely in the sun, being pale skinned indoor breeds. Finding a 'nice' village can be hard, as people with a property to sell tend to say theirs is nice and you don't know who you can trust and who is exaggerating. People who live in BG full time may assume their village is safe because they've never been burgled yet, when they might have if they'd ever left it empty. Those who genuinely live in a good, safe and friendly place, are (understandably) not always keen to let strangers know in case they are inadvertently letting in the unscrupulous, and advertising the presence of properties worth rifling. I hoped people would p.m. me about safe friendly locations where we could leave a property unoccupied and not lose everything, but in fact hardly anyone did and one can't blame them really. I'd still like to know though, because although I love our house, there's a neighbour who plays loud music all the time, and I don't want to make waves because he's been there longer and nobody else seems to mind, so I wouldn't want to spoil his enjoyment of life just because I prefer peace &
quiet! I'd rather re-sell and find a place where I wouldn't start out by upsetting anyone.

Oldun, I'm so glad you are finding life there better again, at least with a UK base you keep your options open don't you. Once you know you could leave at any time, I imagine it will be easier to see exactly what you will put up with and what you won't!

I must admit I never waited to find out if we could live in our village without the fear of burglary, we had a Police 5 Minute armed response alarm fitted. So when ever we go out we activate the alarm. So far the Police have come to the house 3 times and that was when we went into the garage and forgot the thing was on. [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.] In fact they do turn up very quickly and they are armed. I don't know of any village in BG which does not have Gipsy's but not all of them are rough. Being accepted is the thing. We go about our day to day life with no troubles and live a happy and contented existence. Our next door neighbour is usually as drunk as a skunk after about 4 PM but he leaves us alone and usually goes home and sleeps it off until the next time. Out friends are mostly Bulgarians and if they like you they look after you and you become part of the village.

_________________
Cast off all care, inhale fresh air.
Back to top Go down
oldun
Super user
Super user


Posts : 1275
Join date : 2009-09-19

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Fri Nov 02, 2012 8:43 am

Fruitlover you are right - I have found a solution to my conundrum to leave or stay! Showing nice folks our property and village, which they loved and felt happy in having walked around on their own, I realise what we have and have decided to stay. Talked ourselves into it! My caravan can be there for holiday visits and to see family and keeping our my independence. It has been a valuable exercise.
As for finding a village that fits totally with anyone's requirements is really taking pot luck anywhere. So many words have been written on this subject and my feelings are that if something really would upset you, then Bulgaria is not for you in spite of the affordability and climate(???). One man's meat is another man's poison and of course, the price comes into it.
There are Roma everywhere even if they are not a permanent fixture, they do roam (not meant to be funny) in the summer to other villages to find work in the fields or logging in Autumn. These are very poor displaced people but many do not deserve the reputation they have. Even some Brits behave so badly sometimes that we have a bad reputation.
Yes, animals are abused everywhere but in Bulgaria they are for food and work. Pets are generally only for 'town' Bulgarians who I have seen using the vet services and many strays in Veliko Turnovo are spayed by vets here so something is being done. Once again, it should be remembered that Bulgaria is a very poor country in general and animals are way down the line for priority spending unfortunately. There is little education of children about how to care for animals. However, some British people are trying to help by running shelters so seek these out if you are really worried about this situation.
It would be great if a British TV company sponsored a travelling vet and van to spay village animals and give some good advice as I have seen on Animal Planet. However, pigs might fly I think!!!
Back to top Go down
Brian1
Senior user
Senior user
avatar

Posts : 215
Join date : 2010-08-13

PostSubject: Re: Real life   Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:50 pm

keep it coming folks I am loving this post and it really does help not on me but many other I would think.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Real life   

Back to top Go down
 

Real life

View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 3 of 3Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3

 Similar topics

-
» Star pictures
» IHA-"Plant of Life" babies (cool houseplant)
» My First Real SFG
» Real BBQ?
» Life is a Highway

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
 :: Life in Bulgaria-