HomePortalFAQRegisterLog in

altText
altText
altText
altText
altText
altText

Share | 
 

 Traveling from Bulgaria

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
AuthorMessage
willowsend
Mega user
Mega user
avatar

Posts : 2220
Join date : 2009-11-10

PostSubject: Traveling from Bulgaria   Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:07 am

First topic message reminder :

A new topic. It would be intresting to find out members views as to why so many people are leaving Bulgaria,
it can't be to seek a better life, or can it ???

On a recent trip the Wizzair flight to Bourgas had approx 25 empty seats, on the return flight four day's later it was full, does that indicate that more and more are leaving Bulgaria than staying. I am sure they were not leaving because they read about the pending weather forcast :C:
Let's have some positive input with news and views T
Back to top Go down

AuthorMessage
willowsend
Mega user
Mega user
avatar

Posts : 2220
Join date : 2009-11-10

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Fri Oct 21, 2011 5:54 pm

Excellent post Daisy, that is the tpye of post I was hoping for when I started the topic. It covers many positives and negatives and is good advice
And T varnagirl you have said what I thought and hoped you might say
:Thank you:To both of you
Back to top Go down
beautifulangel
Super user
Super user


Posts : 481
Join date : 2011-03-05

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Fri Oct 21, 2011 11:33 pm

having just travelled back from sofia to london, i would say the majority of passengers were bulgarian. those we talked to at the airport either lived in london and had been visiting family or were going to visit family. so maybe there isn't a big exit as such it could as previously suggested that you happened to be on a flight with a lot of holiday trade and long stayers. I guess only time will tell as to how many settle and how many feel it's not for them and leave. but we'll be swelling the numbers by two adults, one child, 5 horses and a dog next week. s

_________________
happiness is free,share it and make someone smile today.
Back to top Go down
http://beautifulangel-movingtobulgaria.blogspot.com/
dave b
Senior user
Senior user


Posts : 178
Join date : 2010-01-20

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Sat Oct 22, 2011 7:20 am

Hi all, Have been off for months now, nothing personal, lots to do, (try to do) :: but this was a great article. I guess as we are still here, we have more stamina or desperation to stay. All I have to do now is read the last few hundred letters and I will have caught up.
Back to top Go down
LisA
Super user
Super user
avatar

Posts : 391
Join date : 2010-10-17

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Sat Oct 22, 2011 12:35 pm

The world crisis hit Bulgaria real estate quite badly, and the general rip off attitude and mismanagement of the country (corruption) social and employment issues have also played a part of the drones of people leaving. The health service in Bulgaria is a trading place for doctors who, even though work for the state, are asking and charging ridiculous sums for their services. The cost of medication has become extremely expensive, medicines can not be afforded by those in work, let alone pensioners and those who are long-term sick.

The cost of living is another factor. The price of food, fuel, clothing and utilities are fast approaching Western European prices, where wages are four times that of a Bulgarians wage which most people in Bulgaria don’t earn. Another problem is the state of the countries infrastructure. Good infrastructure gives a feeling of a permanent and structured place to live which is something that is just not happening here oh yes they will spend money in Sofia for all the world to see but I wonder how some of the EU member states would feel if they were given a tour of the real Bulgaria?

Another major problem is the politeness of people at every level. "
I’m only serving you because I’v got to"
The majority of these workers are not paid very well but most of these companies restaurants , hotels etc will charge you the earth by comparison.


I think unless a miracle happens, and a competent government addresses the real issues here in Bulgaria, then we will continue to see a mass exodus from Bulgaria.
Back to top Go down
Brian1
Senior user
Senior user
avatar

Posts : 215
Join date : 2010-08-13

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Wed Oct 26, 2011 8:43 pm

When moving to a foreign land such as Bulgaria, especially if you have children, crime should always be one of the first things to be researched which is often difficult to on the interweb objectively? this may be your only resource if you don't know anyone resident in the country because there are so many sensationalist news stories published which tend to skew one's outlook. Crime is always a difficult thing to gauge for the simple reason that it doesn't always get reported, so the media relies on a combination of anecdotal experience and public crime surveys to get a handle on what is going on (but of course the public also feed off the media and crime sells!). This is not solely the case for Bulgaria. As far as our experience goes, we haven't been here long enough to give any decent advice of our own, however we have spoken to a lot of ex-pats and residents here as for us this is the best way of getting an idea of what sort of crime occurs in addition to reading first hand accounts on forums.

Crime is of a different sort in the countryside to that in towns and cities. I lived in Camden, London for 10 years before moving here, and there gun crime is rife and people would regularly get shot in the neighbourhood, mostly gang-related incidents. In addition to this several of my acquaintances and friends had been mugged in the vicinity of my home. I am not about to compare our village in Bulgaria to Camden it's a different sort of life and a different sort of crime that goes on here. I felt safe in Camden because I was familiar with the environment and I knew how to avoid sticky situations (no walking down dark alleys at night for me!). Ok so why have I added this to this topic? because I think this is a major concern to those who are leaving Bulgaria Crime is something that most fail to look at ? yes we all look at the weather? the cost of living? the health system and so on but very few ever look at crime so for my contribution to this brilliant thread I will add CRIME.
Back to top Go down
cowshed-sarah
Super user
Super user
avatar

Posts : 316
Join date : 2010-03-24
Age : 70

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:00 pm

Fascinating post and reply's. I don't know why so many are leaving but I do think that something oldun said in another topic is something that a lot of Brits should take on board and if they did then maybe they would still be here. Look at what oldun says

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] wrote:
I was just thinking about personality traits that might be useful for living permanently in Bulgaria, or anywhere abroad for that matter. This follows my train of thought after posting on 'why Brits are not buying in Bulgaria'. I would suggest the following:
1. Self reliance.
2. Sense of humour
3. Ability to accept new culture
4. The ability to make new friendships based on knowledge and not gossip.
5. Ability to sort out problems without blaming the country, someone else etc etc
6. The ability to take the rough with the smooth.
7. To accept that we are not all the same which applies to all nationalities
8. To accept the rules and regulations of the new country even if they seem ridiculous.
9. To accept the climate and understand that 'cold' means colder than you ever experienced in Britain and similarly 'hot'.
10. Give Bulgaria a chance before you complain and don't try to change the country to your desires.
Lastly just remember that Bulgarians complain about the way things are here too just as Brits do in Britain. Its for them to sort out not us.
Well thats my list and if someone thinking of moving here doesn't think they can fulfill this list then my advice would be -retiring abroad particularly in Bulgaria, is not for you.
This could be a very helpful list. Anyone add more or does anyone disagree?
Back to top Go down
itchyfeet
Mega user
Mega user
avatar

Posts : 2267
Join date : 2010-09-10
Age : 61
Location : Paskalevets

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Thu Oct 27, 2011 9:50 am

[size=50:2di8623w]Voices Newspaper

[size=150:2di8623w]Legion's class of 2011 dries up

Rapid fall in foreign pupil numbers

THE ‘Brit family drain’ away from Didim in South West Turkey has had a major impact on foreign class numbers – with one school reporting an incredible seven-year low.

The new school term last month saw just 15 British pupils report back at Valiler School, in Altinkum – even below the 20 youngsters that were joining in 2004. Even more concerning was the fact that there were no new registrations this year.

This compared to the height of the property boom and the ‘foreign invasion’ of 2005-2006 - where the 2005 figure was 47 pupils and a major jump to 80 in 2006 at Valiler.

However, there has since been a rapid decline with just 33 reporting back to Valiler in September 2007 and a consequent tailing off, with very few new intakes since then.

The current lack of numbers has pointed up the sheer numbers of families who came here to live and deciding to head back to the UK or other foreign countries due to a number of reasons, including the economic crises, the fall in interest rates and personal issues.

A spokesman for Valiler Elementary School said it had no new registrations this year and less English students attending compared to previous years.

Valiler is reportedly the only elementary school in Didim with English students. The school has eight British students at grades one to five and seven British students at grades 6 to 8.

Across the town, there are five British students at high schools in Didim: two students at Zeynep-Mehmet Dönmez Hotel management and Tourism Vocational High School and three students at Selçuk Özsoy Vocational and Girls Vocational High School.

However, the remaining pupils at Valiler Elementary School said they were adapting well to the culture and had made many Turkish friends.

There is currently an exodus of Brits leaving Turkey for pastures new, Bulgaria has been the main country that Brits have gone to live. Therefore, believe or not BG will benefit from the arrivals with Brits spending their money in Bulgaria.
Back to top Go down
oldun
Super user
Super user


Posts : 1275
Join date : 2009-09-19

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Fri Oct 28, 2011 2:30 pm

Thank you Cowshed-Sarah for reminding me of my post. I wonder how many will take it on board or think I am talking out of my bottom! On a forum or internet in general, we do not know who we are talking to. Therefore some will agree and some will not. This is also the main reason why people leave Bulgaria permanently. Its just not what they expected! I have had someone who bought a holiday home about 5 years ago and even after several visits still cannot understand why the water is off! Having explained that there is a major water pipe break at the top of the village they want to know when the water will be back on. Well obviously when its fixed - probably today but depends of the severity of the break. S.....happens here too not just in Britain or anywhere else. If this kind of thing can upset you then please stay in Britain and complain where you can at least argue in English. All the research in the world will not help you if you are not cut out for an adventure! If you take it as a challenge to be overcome its great. Each challenge overcome gives a great feeling of strength that you can survive. One day recently after a surprising 11cms of wet snow dumped on Bulgaria, our village was without water, electric and internet. A woodburner, a gas ring and candles - no problem just another adventure which affected not just the Brits but Bulgarians too of course. No-one complained and one even commented 'economic!' Bulgarians are a hardy lot whereas Brits seem to have gone soft. Still, what do I know? I left Britain through necessity not choice and made a life in Greece which was a great preparation for life in Bulgaria and that was pre-EU so I am prepared for Bulgaria to have even bigger problems should they go into the Euro - if it still exists.
I have to argue the cost of living being on a par with Britain - absolute rubbish. Eg. our electric average 46levs per month. Wood roughly 400levs for 6 cubics lasting a 5 month winter. Water roughly 7levs per month average and wait for it!- house taxes 27levs per year!!!!! I agree lots of food prices have shot up but its still possible eating simply and little imported stuff on a very limited budget. Of course, I am talking village living but very near VT. By the way, our village shop does stock Nescafe because we are good customers and asked for it although I am becoming of fan of 'kafe normal!'
Before anyone thinks I live a charmed life I can assure them I have experienced corruption when my partner was assaulted and we had to employ a lawyer to get the court result ( I need say no more) and although I have no car I am well aware of the state of the roads and all the other problems Bulgaria has but it takes many years to change from a Communist regime. I sometimes wonder, given the recession, if Capitalism is any better. Just the other side of the coin and the ordinary chap just has to cope. As for infrastructure, with no car, I find buses and public transport in general as well as taxis, good value and freely available.
You might realise from this long reply that I have little time for many people who return because probably they thought renovating a ruin was a walk in the park and an easy way to instant riches. Wrong and now they are off.
I am very sympathetic to those with ill-health (although was it wise to come in the first place) or those who have suffered financial difficulties not of their making eg. exchange rates ( who can foretell that?) I am not sympathetic to those Brits who thought to make a quick buck off other Brits because Spain is no longer what it was.
I expect I will have upset some, but that is my honest opinion.
To anyone with a pioneeering and indomitable spirit Bulgaria still has a lot to offer. I am staying. s
Back to top Go down
oldun
Super user
Super user


Posts : 1275
Join date : 2009-09-19

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Fri Oct 28, 2011 2:50 pm

Forgot to mention that a few people suffer from divorce proceedings and often have to sell up.
As for bad service - I really must take issue with this comment. In 7 years I cannot recall ever having bad service and always with a smile. Admittedly, it has occasionally meant an effort on my part to prove I am a 'nice person' which makes me wonder if perhaps some people only get the service they deserve. Remember, a smile goes a long way anywhere and makes it difficult to be surly in response. Where do people shop? I was recently in Technomarket (my first experience of such a huge shop) and was so surprised at the service. My white goods were all unpacked and checked before leaving the shop and the girl who spoke excellent English (although I don't automatically expect it!) asked if the service was as good as in Britain. I said it was much better and the delivery time? Ordered Friday, delivered Tuesday. Thank you once again Bulgaria. Nice surprise.
Back to top Go down
dave b
Senior user
Senior user


Posts : 178
Join date : 2010-01-20

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Fri Oct 28, 2011 2:56 pm

Odun. Having said I do not always see eye to eye with you on some things! This really sums up Bulgaria and living here. Well written and a good post.
Back to top Go down
willowsend
Mega user
Mega user
avatar

Posts : 2220
Join date : 2009-11-10

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Thu Nov 03, 2011 11:18 pm

Hi varnagirl, your post should be in the this topic covering people leaving Bulgaria, because you have highlighted yet another reason why you won't bother
There is nobody left to celebrate with
remember ,remember the 5th of November !
by varnagirl » 03 Nov 2011 17:47

anyone in Bg celebrating bonfire night ..with or without friends ???

we used to ..but all our crowd has returned to Uk ...so dont expect I,l bother...how about yourselves ?
varnagirl
Super user
Back to top Go down
Carmen
Super user
Super user
avatar

Posts : 714
Join date : 2010-03-19

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Wed Nov 09, 2011 6:54 pm

It made sense to buy a property in Bulgaria if you couldn’t buy one somewhere like else? In fact, it was almost madness not to consider the market. However, beneath all the truth about Bulgaria being poised on the brink of EU entry and all the benefits that can bring were some less palatable truths that were ignored. They were ignored by the marketers, the estate agents, the developers and the buyers. Such truths were that EU entry doesn’t mean a country will benefit from any fiscal stimulus overnight, that Bulgaria’s charms are limited, that the nation has extreme legacy issues from its communist past that will restrict its growth for many years and that it is not going to be an ‘easy’ country to move to for a new life for many, many years – if ever! The fact of the matter is, Bulgaria was possibly the biggest victim of over-hyped overselling of property at a time when we Brits and the Irish couldn’t get enough of the stuff abroad! We believed that we were rich because we were convinced that the value of our own homes were rising and that the cheap credit and loans that we could get our hands on easily would never be hard to pay back. At the same time we were told about an almost mythical land poised on the brink of EU entry where money was being thrown at the country to make it rise in value across the board. All of these truths are further compounded for the real estate investor by the fact that Bulgaria’s economic fortunes have been hammered for the near future by the fallout from the rest of the world.
Back to top Go down
willowsend
Mega user
Mega user
avatar

Posts : 2220
Join date : 2009-11-10

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Wed Nov 09, 2011 7:42 pm

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] wrote:
It made sense to buy a property in Bulgaria if you couldn’t buy one somewhere like else? In fact, it was almost madness not to consider the market. However, beneath all the truth about Bulgaria being poised on the brink of EU entry and all the benefits that can bring were some less palatable truths that were ignored. They were ignored by the marketers, the estate agents, the developers and the buyers. Such truths were that EU entry doesn’t mean a country will benefit from any fiscal stimulus overnight, that Bulgaria’s charms are limited, that the nation has extreme legacy issues from its communist past that will restrict its growth for many years and that it is not going to be an ‘easy’ country to move to for a new life for many, many years – if ever! The fact of the matter is, Bulgaria was possibly the biggest victim of over-hyped overselling of property at a time when we Brits and the Irish couldn’t get enough of the stuff abroad! We believed that we were rich because we were convinced that the value of our own homes were rising and that the cheap credit and loans that we could get our hands on easily would never be hard to pay back. At the same time we were told about an almost mythical land poised on the brink of EU entry where money was being thrown at the country to make it rise in value across the board. All of these truths are further compounded for the real estate investor by the fact that Bulgaria’s economic fortunes have been hammered for the near future by the fallout from the rest of the world.

:Good post:Carmen and T
I think you have hit the nail on the head with your post
You said:- it was almost madness not to consider the market. so we did like many others
After doing a year of looking and investigating I said to my wife, we ought to invest in property in Bulgaria, the price is right, it's a sound investment and with them going into the EU there must be a future. That was five years ago. British Airways, Bulgarianair, Balkanair, Thomas Cook, Thompsons, Monarch etc, etc, all had flight's nearly every day into Varna and Bourgas and look now, Wizzair twice a week, take it or leave it
So perhaps many of us have made a big mistake and did the wrong thing by following the leader and reading to much in the papers and listening to much to the radio and watching TV advertisments
Anyway, we made our bed so we must lie in it and make the best of it, and let me just add here that even though we have had and still have nasty memories over the last four years with certain perpetrators who did their best to send us packing, we are still there, we have good friends there, we love our villa and we like the village folk who are keeping a watchful eye on our property and us and our guests when we are all there
If you click on our banner at the top of the forum and see the guest comments, it will help you to understand why we have the will to get the best out of a bad job
Back to top Go down
sallyann
Super user
Super user
avatar

Posts : 821
Join date : 2010-02-15

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Mon Nov 14, 2011 1:46 pm

This could be a reason ?

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] ... ews-508892

Bulgaria's Killer Air Exposes Wider EU Problems

Chronic pollution makes Bulgaria one of the world's deadliest places to live because of poor air quality, despite years of efforts to improve monitoring and comply with EU standards. But Bulgaria's problems are not isolated and reflect broader concerns over air quality among EU member states.

Bulgaria has made steady progress in improving environmental monitoring and adopting regulations on air, water and environmental quality since joining the EU in 2007.

Analysts say such steps have been followed by hollow enforcement and neglect by both national and EU authorities.

"
We have very good laws and monitoring systems in place, but the biggest problem is we have no state agency that can enforce the laws,"
said Georgi Stefanov, policy and climate change officer for the environmental group WWF. "
We have everything but enforcement."


As the European Commission begins to weigh changes to the EU's 2008 air quality directive, analysts say Bulgaria – like many other EU countries – is failing at enforcement.

The Commission is expected to revamp its air quality standards no later than 2013.

Heavy industrialisation left a toxic legacy in Bulgaria at the end of communism in 1989, but today's problems centre on outmoded energy and industrial infrastructure, and an ageing transport fleet.

Poverty also contributes, says Stefanov, with large pockets of itinerant communities dependent on wood and other fuels for heating and cooking – spewing hazards to both indoor and outdoor air quality.

Poor air quality has deadly consequences in Bulgaria as well as Romania, which trail only Armenia in having the world's second highest mortality rates from urban air pollution, according to the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

The UNDP's 2011 Human Development Report, released on 2 November, shows that while the annual death rate from poor air quality is slightly higher in Romania (439 deaths per million people compared to 437 in Bulgaria), Bulgaria leads Europe in the intensity of air pollution, ranking in the top one-quarter of the most polluted of the 187 countries included in the report.

Only Armenia has a higher annual mortality rate than the two EU countries – 882 per million population in a country of 3 million people.

The UNDP's findings drive home the extreme risks of polluted air beyond Bulgaria, which has an urban pollution level that is double the regional average. EU candidate Turkey also has high levels of urban pollution, 37 microgrammes per cubic meter, exceeding the regional average of 25 microgrammes per cubic meter, says the report.

And within the current EU, the Commission has taken action against 20 EU members for air quality violations.

No monopoly on bad air

Though the EU air quality directive is due for a revamp, some health experts say indoor and outdoor air quality do not get enough attention.

"
Many of the policy decisions that are currently being made often neglect or fail to take into account health concerns sufficiently,"
said Juha Pekkanen, a physician who heads the environmental health department at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland.

Pekkanen says air pollution is a serious health threat, noting that as many as 2,000 Finns die each year because of long-term exposure to particulate matter. He urges stronger policies aimed at cutting air pollution through cleaner-burning fuels and improvements in energy and transport efficiency.

Environmentalists also fear that often-conflicting EU and national rules – from a focus on diesel and biofuels in transport, to energy policies that still subsidise the coal industry – neglect the need for air-quality improvements.

Air pollutants that include sulphur dioxide emitted from burning coal to lead contained in motor fuels contributed to the premature deaths of 370,000 across Europe in 2000. And even with stronger air quality standards aimed at drastic reductions in toxins, the European Environment Agency (EEA) estimates the death rate will still be 230,000 in 2020.

EEA statistics show that in the past decade, 20% to 50% of city dwellers in the EU were exposed to levels of particulates in excess of the daily standards, contributing to short-term effects such as itchy eyes and sinus problems to long-term respiratory, heart ailments and cancer.

But policies, no matter how well-meaning, don't always yield the best results. The EU has pushed diesel over gasoline because it is more efficient and emits less carbon dioxide, even though it produces more particulate pollution that is harmful to humans. Biofuels are cleaner than their fossil-fuel counterparts, yet there is an open debate about whether their production is more harmful to air quality as well as their impact on land and water resources.

Even shifting sentiments about the safety of nuclear energy can result in reversal for air quality. In the short term, countries like Belgium and Germany that are vowing a phase-out of atomic power will need fossil fuels to fill the gap between demand on supply.

Bad air days in Bulgaria

Bulgaria, meanwhile, is credited with dramatic improvements in pollution monitoring and, following earlier frictions, working with Romania to develop pollution monitoring in border communities along the Danube in an effort to comply with UN agreements on transboundary pollution.

Yet Bulgaria has a long way to go to put in practice what national laws and EU rules put on paper. Last year, the Commission warned the country that it was violating limits on sulphur dioxide, typically emitted by coal plants, an ingredient in acid rain and in high concentrations, can cause serious respiratory problems in humans.

WWF's Stefanov says he routinely complains to authorities in his Sofia neighbourhood about illegal fires – from burning refuse to tyres set alight so the metal can be recovered for recycling – to little avail.

Older vehicles – mostly imported from other EU countries – contribute to urban smog, he says, something that could be addressed through a premium tax on polluting cars. The government and municipalities have been slower than private companies to modernise publicly owned electricity and heating plants with smokestack scrubbers.

He sees little political resolve with much political energy spent on economic growth and job-creation.

"
Not one of our politicians is connecting air pollution to health,"
he said, a day after the 30 October presidential and local elections in the country. And he said the European Commission is too complacent in enforcing air quality and other environmental rules.

"
They wait, wait, wait until it is too late."
Back to top Go down
bigsavak
Super user
Super user
avatar

Posts : 756
Join date : 2009-09-16

PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   Sat Nov 26, 2011 8:56 pm

Something to add

Mass Exodus of Brits Looms for Bulgaria

British citizens are selling their Bulgarian coastal properties and are leaving the country.

The news was reported Saturday by the Bulgarian TV channel bTV, saying that every other British-owned house in the village of Avren, near the northern Black Sea shore of Bulgaria, until now considered a paradise for foreigners, is listed for sale.

The Brits first came in large numbers to the village, which is located about 40 km from the Black Sea capital Varna, in 2003. They purchased houses then as investment, in order to resell them at higher prices after the country's EU accession. However, some 70 Brits later became permanent residents of Avren. The last wave happened four years ago.

bTV cite a British woman, who arrived with this last wave, saying she came for the money because she did not want to be doomed to poverty in England over her miserable State pension.

"
With this money here, I can really enjoy life – I furnished a beautiful home with a splendid view;
I can go the restaurant whenever I want,"
the woman explains, but adds she is disappointed and dissatisfied by the bad condition of the streets in the village. She further points out that her fellow country people, especially younger ones without a stable income, have left over the crisis after they realized expectations for profits from the property would not materialize.

Local real estate brokers report that most of the houses are mortgaged and owners now cannot make regular payments on the loans.

Others are leaving over the constantly increasing crime rate with many houses being robbed and the police failing to protect their owners.

The Mayor of Avren vowed before bTV that the local authorities will focus on improving both infrastructure and safety.

People from Avren hope that British owners will be replaced by Russian ones.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Traveling from Bulgaria   

Back to top Go down
 

Traveling from Bulgaria

View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 2 of 3Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

 Similar topics

-
» Jewelry Traveling bags!!
» buying windows 10 in bulgaria
» List of English speaking doctors in Bulgaria
» Campsite's & Camping in Bulgaria
» List of Garages in Bulgaria

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
 :: Traveling to and around Bulgaria-