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 The EU and Expats

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willowsend
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PostSubject: The EU and Expats   Wed Jan 23, 2013 3:38 pm

First topic message reminder :

Now here is an interesting topic to get our teeth into. Let's have a debate on the pro's and con's regarding this subject ie:- what impact will it have on the economy, border controls, passports, tourism, EU parliament, banking and areas related to finances, etc etc
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itchyfeet
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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Sun Jan 27, 2013 2:49 pm

cowshed-sarah wrote:
It won't work. Does Cameron think we a stupid, how many times have we been promised things before an election and then not got what we voted for.


I have seen decades of one political party after another take over running the country and pleased to see the last one finish. Only trouble was, every new party in power were equally inefficient and never did what they promised. In the middle of this in 1973 we had Ted Heath telling us that the EU would enable us all to transfer any goods from one EU country to another tax free. This was the principal on which we voted to join the Common Market, comments from me on this are unnecessary I believe!!

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willowsend
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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Sun Jan 27, 2013 3:04 pm

oldun wrote:
Apart from the fact that many people voting will not understand the situation and will just vote on prejudices, why go to the people anyway? Maybe the Government haven't a clue what to do so they ask the proletariat. Then it will be their fault whatever the outcome. I thought the point of a general election was to trust the chosen ones to do the job. Its just a political exercise again.

Excuse me for being stupid but can any clued up members answer this question. If Britain pulled out and Scotland got independence would that mean that England were no longer EU members and Scotland would remained in
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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Sun Jan 27, 2013 3:28 pm

willowsend wrote:
Excuse me for being stupid but can any clued up members answer this question. If Britain pulled out and Scotland got independence would that mean that England were no longer EU members and Scotland would remained in

I have no idea on what would happen if Scotland got independence, but after Cameron's statement to the EU the Pound has tumbled against the Leva at 2.29 today and also fallen sharply against the Turkish Lira, it is also down to the Euro and the American dollar. So thanks Cameron for interferring and making my pension stretch even less further than it did before.

Whilst we are airing our views on whether the UK should stay in or out of the EU, has any members considered how coming out of the EU would affect us Expats living in an EU country and us not belonging any more. How would our residents permits be affected? How would we stand owning land and property on would effectively be in a foreign country. Other non EU countries have expensive and punitive ways of dealing with foreigners in this way and of course it becomes expensive to legally stay and live in a non EU country.

On a personal note, we are pleased to be in BG and them to be part of the EU, after 5 years of living in Turkey and putting up with the way they treat foreigners we are only too pleased to be living here.

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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Sun Jan 27, 2013 11:42 pm

I am confused by what I have read today. If Britain did pull out of the EU (which I don't think they will) does that mean that all the Bulgarians supposedly coming to Britain that they will be leaving an EU country and coming to a foreign country or is it all pie in the sky

[size=150:3cpnrqq5]Thousands of Bulgarians, Romanians plan to flood UK in 2014: Mail on Sunday
27 January 2013 | 09:08 | FOCUS News Agency

Home / European Union

London. Hordes of Romanians and Bulgarians are already preparing to head for Britain in search of work, according to a Mail on Sunday investigation, The Mail on Sunday reads
Employment restrictions will be relaxed on December 31, and the UK will throw open its Jobcentres and benefit offices to what pressure group Migration Watch predicts could be as many as 70,000 people a year for the next five years.
The Government refuses to reveal its own estimates and the authorities in Romania and Bulgaria are sceptical of Migration Watch figures, but have not compiled their own.
However, our research in the EU’s two poorest countries found plenty of migrants among their combined populations of 29 million waiting for the chance to travel to Britain.
As soon as they find a job, they will also become eligible for a raft of income-related benefits far more generous than anything on offer in their home countries.
Access to welfare payments in Britain is easier than in either Germany or France, which will be relaxing work restrictions at the same time.
One job agency in Bucharest told our undercover reporter it already has hundreds registering for work in the UK from 2014 and the waiting list is so long they are no longer accepting applications.
Across the Danube in the Zhenski Pazar market in Sofia, Bulgaria, virtually everyone we spoke to said they would come to Britain.
While the minimum wage in the UK is £6.19 per hour, in Bulgaria it is just 73p. Romania is not much better at 79p.
Meanwhile, the average weekly wage in Bulgaria is £63.50 and £86 in Romania.
The only state benefit available in either country is child benefit, which is £3.50 per child per week in Bulgaria and £3.69 in Romania. In Britain, a single person can claim up to £71 a week in jobseekers’ allowance and a couple can claim £111. Housing benefit varies depending on local authorities. Child benefit adds another £20.30 a week for the first child and £13.40 for each one after that.


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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Mon Jan 28, 2013 9:44 am

One thing that would change for pensioners permanently in Bulgaria would be that pensions would again be frozen. We would also be back to the expensive and bureaucratic Lichna Carta which was in operation prior to EU entry. I think many Brits would then discover how difficult it was in many ways before EU entry. I think I would be relocating to my caravan in Britain because it would be increasingly expensive to stay here.
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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:20 am

A follow up to my previous post [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]


[size=150:1k0hqp3q]Bulgaria only just realised the existence of fines in the EU
28 January 2013 | 02:35 | FOCUS News Agency

Home / European Union

Sofia. Bulgaria must realise that its EU membership is not a matter of choice on whether to assume an EU attitude or not, but an obligation that will be forced upon it regardless, including with sanctions, the Sega daily writes in a commentary on the European Commission referring Bulgaria to the EU Court of Justice over its internal energy market and the assignment of digital broadcast spectrum, as well as its reasoned opinion on air pollution in the country. The EC is forced to extort any sort of improvement in the Bulgarians’ way of living in accordance with EU standards as it faces the stubborn lack of understanding and unwillingness of the Bulgarian government to implement them. The Sega notes that shifting the responsibility between the state regulator and the Economy Ministry has no justification power before the EC. Bulgaria should also not rely on the EC’s naivete and introduce changes only formally. All EU member states are treated on equal grounds. EU states also tend to keep an eye on each other and make sure that there is no favouritism towards some, while others are being sanctioned, the daily concludes.
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oldun
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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:46 pm

The Bulgarians, like the Greeks, only see the possibility of money coming in by way of handouts to improve things like agriculture and infrastructure. They do not grasp the fact that these improvements have to be seen to be made and the money eventually paid back when productivity is increased. As for member states being equal - what a laugh that is!
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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Mon Jan 28, 2013 4:08 pm

Everyone is equal..just some are more equal than others.
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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:24 pm

I have followed these posts with great interest.
I was always against the EU to be honest and i still am. England joined the EU but only stuck their tow in. They haven't taken on the euro they haven't opened their borders to name just two things of the many things they have held on.
I did buy in Bulgaria and lived here before Bulgaria joined the EU and to be honest i think it was good in fact very good.
Now there has been funding for roads and infrastructure but at the cost of fines for what wood to burn or not to burn.
Bulgaria was already doing great things with dairy export and sunflower oil production growing it and bottling it.
I think the growth of what can be seen in BG would have happened any way EU or no EU. Now the Bulgarians and us expats are all concerned as to what will happen with the euro. Any thing one lev will become 1 euro no doubt on that we have seen it in all the other counries that adopted it.
Look at the trouble they are all in now.
My father joined the cavalry in England during 1933 sadly he was to be involved with a war a few years later and it changed him for ever. i am sure every one knows some one who's life was ruined because of war and suffered for the rest of their lives and now as the next generation we have allowed Germany to take over Europe and more Now where was the sence in all the war.
I know war doesn't make sence any way lots of distruction death and sadness but what the hell did all the previous generation go through so we could all surrender to Germany.
England needs to get the conservative out. It was the same in the Margaret Thatcher days. Every thing was her way and Cameron is doing his way with out thought for the people. There are no houses for people in England now large company's such as Ford motors has pulled out most of it's production there are no jobs for the younger generation because there was no good education system whilst they were at school. NHS has gone to pot and if England was at war again it couldn't feed it self as it can't now.
My generation in my opinion have had the best years for that i am greatful but it does concern me for my grandchildren.
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PostSubject: Re: The EU and Expats   Fri Feb 08, 2013 1:50 am

I was reading this post from another forum earlier and what we have to ask is when is it going to stop?

Quote :
The Irish government overnight struck a 'deal' on our toxic bank debt with the ECB. This debt, which is not ours in the first place, as in the taxpayer, amounted to 28 billion euros and was created by the malpractices of Anglo Irish Bank and Irish Nationwide. Our new re structuring of this debt involves pushing the repayment period out longer to ensure lower instalments. The period? 40 years. Have you guessed what's coming next? The punchline? Well the Irish government had a 28 billion debt on this on Wednesday afternoon but by the time we woke up on Thursday morning they were celebrating a deal which turned that into a 54 billion debt! The interest over 40 years almost doubles the total.
So you see, its not only British governments who have the monopoly on this kind of outrageous madness.
A baby born in Ireland today will still be paying this bank debt when they are 40 years of age. We should never have been saddled with this debt in the first place but if they hadn't changed the terms of the original payments then we would have finished paying the 28 billion in 2022, in 9 years time. :evil::evil::evil::evil::evil:


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