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 Steel bars on windows and a few other questions

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oldian
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PostSubject: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Mon Jul 27, 2015 2:15 pm

Hi been looking on the internet at houses etc  and have noticed lots of houses have bars on the windows ,is crime on holiday homes bad ? also quite like the look of the livada area close to burgas does anyone know if there are vets in that area ,also when the uk has a referendum will a vote to leave cause problems for brits in Bulgaria lastly as we would travel with our dog is it easy to find dog friendly hotels on the way ,I know I cannot drive through Germany as olly is banned there no probs in France  as we live there for 5 months ,That's all for now cant think of anything else s
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oddball
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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Mon Jul 27, 2015 3:25 pm

oldian wrote:
Hi been looking on the internet at houses etc  and have noticed lots of houses have bars on the windows ,is crime on holiday homes bad ?

Unfortunately Oldian many Brits are targeted as the house is empty so classed as easy pickins.  From May we have had 5 families who have been broken into and all their stuff taken, not only household items they have tried taken the tiles off the walls and floors in two houses. It is a big shock to people even though they know there is always that possibility.  We have had 3 attempted breakins each time they have smashed and broken the outside roller shutters and smashed the double glazed windows. They even managed to get a metal door with 10 locks open but thankfully our alarm has sensors everwhere so as soon as a door or window opens the alarms goes off.  We then had bars fitted to all the windows.

Last year we came here and found they tried to get in through the roof, they climbed up to the second floor then onto the roof, took off the tiles and stacked them neatly, then tried to get in but the way our roof is built they could not get through to the next section so they gave up, but then when the rain and snow came the water got into the roof and ran down to the main bedroom, destroying everything inside even the floor. Now we have cameras and a nice trap set for anyone else who might like to try.  

It is heartbreaking to see what damage they can do just to get a few things to sell.  All the 5 families have moved back to the UK now and I doubt they will have anything to do with BG again.  Although one couple will come back to a friends rented apartment but will never buy again.  You really need to be living in BG or have someone living in your house, but that is another story and can caused major problems as many will tell you.

Brits living here cannot go on holiday unless they find someone to live in their house, not that can be to either look after the animals or to ensure the house does not get broken into.

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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Mon Jul 27, 2015 4:33 pm

Agree with oddy about the break ins etc. As far as the uk leaving the EU is concerned its highly unlikely however while much of the debate about the UK’s membership focusses upon the 2.3 million citizens of other EU countries living in the UK, a nearly identical number of UK citizens live in other Member States. There has been surprisingly little discussion about what would happen to them if the UK left the EU. ‘Europe Day’ is a suitable occasion to look at this issue in more detail.

Essentially, there are three different scenarios following withdrawal, as far as the movement of people between the UK and the remaining EU is concerned.

In the first scenario, the UK retains its membership in the European Economic Area (EEA), an existing treaty which extends much of the EU’s single market, and some related policies, to Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein. This would mean that all the existing rules on the free movement of people continue to apply.

But is this politically realistic? The opponents of UK membership of the EU traditionally based their arguments on issues of cost and sovereignty. These arguments have not disappeared, but they have been joined by a third main argument: immigration control. The EEA does allow its members to adopt safeguard measures if there are ‘serious economic, societal or environmental difficulties of a sectorial or regional nature’ which are ‘liable to persist’, but these measures must be ‘restricted with regard to their scope and duration to what is strictly necessary in order to remedy the situation’. It is questionable whether these limited possibilities would be sufficient to satisfy those who are concerned about the numbers of people in the UK from the rest of (or rather, the remaining) European Union.


In the second scenario, the UK and the EU negotiate an ad hoc solution regulating the movement of persons, which falls short of the EEA rules but which contains some special rules which facilitate the movement of persons to some degree. But it’s impossible to know at this point whether such an agreement would be signed, and what its content would be. So it’s not possible to analyse this possibility in any detail.

The third scenario is that there’s no agreement between the UK and EU on this issue, and so only the national law of the UK on the one hand, and the EU and its Member States on the other hand, regulates the issue. It’s possible that the second and third scenarios could be combined in some way. For instance, there could be a treaty which focuses entirely, or mostly, upon protecting the rights of those persons who moved before the UK’s withdrawal, leaving the issue of migration after the withdrawal date to be governed by national law (and partly by EU law, for the remaining Member States).

We have a good idea what this third scenario would entail, for those UK citizens who live (or would like to live) in the remaining EU. That’s because there is already a significant body of EU immigration law. Since the UK has opted out of most of it, this law hasn’t attracted much attention in the UK, but it would be hugely relevant to UK citizens in the remaining EU in the event of the third scenario. There’s also a body of EU asylum law, and if UK citizens were non-EU citizens (third-country nationals), they could apply for asylum in the EU (and vice versa). But (for now at least) this prospect seems improbable.
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BGTRAVELLER
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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Mon Jul 27, 2015 4:41 pm

THE likelihood of the UK leaving the EU looks slim with Prime Minister David Cameron saying he will seek to renegotiate the country’s relationship with the EU rather than looking to exit.


“Is it not in Britain’s national interest to argue for changes which... will strengthen and sort out the relationship between Britain and the EU, and then to ask the British people for their consent?” asked Mr Cameron during a recent Commons question time.


Any new terms are unlikely to affect Britons in France, said Christopher Chantrey, chairman of the Paris branch of Conservatives Abroad; though he said there is a risk they would tarnish Britain’s image, with the UK being seen as only in the EU for its own benefit.


“I think the basic rights will be still there, I can’t see other states agreeing to any changes to them – one of them being freedom of movement. It’s going to be things like the working time directives and legislation on pay.”


It was unlikely Britain would leave the EU. “I think realism will prevail as people realise there’s too much to lose.”


Question marks do remain however, over the result if new terms are turned down at a referendum or if they are not agreed by the other states.


Back to 1973


If Britain comes out, there is a risk we would “go back to where we were before 1973,” Mr Chantrey said.


“You had to have a foreigner’s resident’s card and it was much more bureaucratic. We wouldn’t have a right to be here; we’d only be here if the French didn’t mind.”


Franco-British avocat Gérard Barron of Boulogne-sur-Mer said refusal by other states of a renegotiation could mean Britain having to make a decision on staying or leaving.


This would require a referendum, which in turn would mean “a very long and heated debate in both parliament and the media” before it took place. “I don’t think people are stupid. Once they have totted it up they will realise that in the long term it might mean they won’t be able to go on holiday on the continent any more because the pound could become like the Moroccan dhiram [worth e0.09]; they will lose at least half of their trade with Europe and have to import more. I think everyone would vote to stay in.”


If the opposite happened, there would be transitional arrangements over at least two or three years, ensuring British residents did not immediately lose current rights, he said. However ultimately Britons would be in the position of other non-EU nationals - they would need to apply for residency permits from the prefecture.


With regard to healthcare, étrangers with residency cards have the right to the CMU (free membership of state healthcare for those on the lowest incomes, or otherwise membership via payment of a percentage of income).


Even if the renegotiation fails, chances are “close to zero” Britain would sever all ties, Mr Barron said. What is more likely, would be retaining membership of the EEA, like Switzerland or Norway. “This gives everyone virtually the same rights, but the British government would have no say in how the EU is run.” Britons would keep the same residency and healthcare rights, he said.
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meandmine
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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Mon Jul 27, 2015 4:47 pm

I Agree that not much would change. I don't think it's worth worrying about either, would we really leave the EU? People have plenty of reasons to moan about it but Europe has never seen such a sustained period of peace and overall economic success. The grass is definitely not always greener.
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Blink
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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Mon Jul 27, 2015 4:51 pm

Yes sorry to say that security is essential in Bulgaria as is very good neighbours.

As far the EU What I would like to know is when the referendum takes place will expats get a vote .We are UK nationals living in another EU state and should get a vote .If a vote on leaving the EU took place in the host state we would not be eligible .So anyone who is not a UK citizen in the UK will not be able to vote in the UK .As the vote will affect our rights within Europe it is only fair that we also have a voice . Also I am of the opinion that the likes of UKIP should not be permitted to stand for the European parliament as they don't agree with Europe .Should the UK vote to leave the EU that's when the UK will no longer exist it will be little England and no one will bat an eyelid at what England says
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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Mon Jul 27, 2015 4:58 pm

livada is only about 25 Km from Bourgas and there are quite a few vets there [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Mon Jul 27, 2015 6:33 pm

Burglary can happen to you anywhere and in any country, there is a higher risk of it happening in certain areas of Bulgaria but that statement can be related to any country, some people living abroad also like to “flash the cash” so actually set themselves up to be targeted by thieves (no offence intended to anyone) but I have seen this happen in the various countries that I have lived in and I still wonder why people never learn. If you are considering buying a property do your homework on the area thoroughly.  Many people have had holiday homes around us for many years and have never been the victims of any burglary or vandalism to their properties. There are many different security options for properties from alarms to security companies I am sure some one within the area you are looking at can advise you further.

The opt out of EU vote will probably be like the referendum just held by the Greeks, asked in a manner nobody understands and the result disregarded anyway, that’s politicians for you! No point in worrying about it until as, when or if it happens.

Not sure of the vets in the area you are looking at but rest assured the ones we have used may not have all the equipment UK vets have but they are extremely good and very helpful.
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PostSubject: subject   Mon Jul 27, 2015 6:59 pm

I see quite a drift away from the original topic but we now seem to have returned to the main question. It's a sad fact, but one must consider physical security of their house (regardless of living in it full time or not) and is one which should be given close attention.

If you live here full time, like I do, it's fairly obvious that you don't leave attractive, expensive items out in full view and unsecured...it won't be long before they grow legs!! It helps if you create good relationships with as many people in your village as you possibly can....and I'm not talking about throwing parties etc....more like sharing what you grow in your garden, giving someone a lift to town, helping out someone who is obviously struggling etc. etc. What goes around, will come around...eventually. Learn all of their names and learn how to greet them in their own language...make them feel like you are really pleased to see them when you bump into them out on the street....ask their advice on anything at all, even if you don't follow it...we all know how that makes us feel.
At the end of the day, you will still be an outsider, but one who is taking the time to learn their language and ways of life, one who will jump in and help and one who is clearly making an effort to be part of their community. The sense of community is very important to these people and can work very well in your favour...what's theirs is yours and vice versa. I've left my house, workshop and barn unlocked for months at a time and most people knew that...nothing has ever been lifted...borrowed, used, but always returned with a little gift...bottle of Rakia, couple of jars of honey, bags of locally grown tobacco, that sort of thing.

It also helps to have a bluddy big dog!!!
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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Tue Jul 28, 2015 8:18 am

British expats (and non-expats) currently enjoy whatever rights go with EU citizenship. I'd like to think to that these cannot be merely removed by the decision of the Member State to which we happen to belong.
Presumably this wishful thinking has no legal basis?
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oldian
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PostSubject: Re: Steel bars on windows and a few other questions   Tue Jul 28, 2015 9:57 am

Thanks for the replies unfortunately weve only got a little Staffordshire bull terrier who loves everyone so hes no good as a watchdog,looked up the vets thankyou for that ,we have a house in France, but the French economy is getting rapidly worse and our French friends reckon in 10 years it will be like Greece that's why we fancied Bulgaria our pensions would go further ,but the thought of not being able to leave your house without worrying that it would be robbed is a bit off putting .Thanks for your replies I still am doubtful that the UK will vote to stay in the EU I don't know anyone in the Newcastle area who would vote to stay in we would but that's a business thing .Have a nice day s
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